well that’s just plum cherry

     Ok, actually it’s cherry plum…..I think. All i know is this stuff is pink!

     The phloem and cambium layers are bright pink while the sap and heartwood of the tree have streaks of pale pink, fingers crossed it doesn’t fade as it dries.

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     This tree has had a tough go at life and just doesn’t want to stay standing so i am dismantling it crook by crook. Here is one of the stars of the show:

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I’m very excited to keep hacking at this tree. I can see so many spoons just waiting to jump out. Today i got 4 roughed out, all crazy bent spoons. (the above crook is the top spoon in the picture below)

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It’s hard to see the pink color but it’s there. Better photos to follow….            -bk

one of many ways to skin a spoon

I figured i would do a start to semi-finished spoon. We’ll stop at drying on this one. maybe i’ll show it later when it gets it’s wings. This is also helpful to show that i don’t use router jigs or magic wands to get a spoon from a tree.

 

step one: I’ll cut a length suitable for something. Here i’m going for a serving spoon. Note: this is a straight chunk of branch, crooks will make an appearance soon.

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You’ll see that there’s a branch interrupting the party so i cut just before it.

 

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So here’s our piece. Next is to drive a wedge shaped object through it to split it in half. My weapon of choice is an old blacksmithed froe.

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both of these will be spoons eventually. next i flattened any high spots to give me a square blank with even, parallel planes. Next is a step i don’t always do: drawing shapes. I have been trying to chop shapes without a guide recently to get better at seeing the spoon in the material.

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Another step i skip sometimes is sawing relief cuts. for the sake of being thorough i’ll do it here. in the photo the dotted lines are the guide for said saw cuts.

Next up is to cleave the waste off the handle to the relief cut to give us more of a spoon shape.

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A little bit of axe work here and there to make the form come out.

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Next is knife work. Occasionally i will go to the hook but on this one the straight knife told the story first.

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Here’s a side shot to show the profile and relation between handle, stem and bowl.Image

All that’s left before drying is to carve the bowl with the hook which i didn’t capture by itself so it’ll be joined with it’s siblings from todays session. (second from the top)

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those spoons will dry in my bag for a few days then i will finish cut, engrave and oil them.

 

That’s all for today, not too exciting for those experienced or those who don’t give a crap about carving spoons!

 

bk

 

lie-nielsen spoon carving class

lie-nielsen spoon carving class

Hi, I figured after following Peter Follansbee’s blog for the last three years and starting into a whole new type of woodwork, i would start up one of these fancy wordpress sites. This picture is from this past weekend. It is courtesy of Lie-Nielsen Tool works facebook page. I attended their 2 day spoon carving workshop taught by Peter. I was thrilled to be in the same room as other spoon carvers, that rarely happens in my life. Needless to say we had an absolute blast!
Check back soon for more super exciting blog posts about the obscure work i do and the nice little life i live.

bk